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BOOK REVIEW: Malika Fallen Queen Part One

This time we’re going to look at the stunning graphic novel, “Malika Fallen Queen Part One,” by Roye Okupe and YouNeek YouNiverse. This is a historical fiction story like none other I have read. And, although the graphic novel is labeled Part One, it begins in the middle of a long-winding arc, but don’t let that stop you from adding this marvel to your collection.


The story takes place in the Year 2025, with Malika (pronounced “Ma-LIE-kah”) being 500 years from her time period. She is in a new place and time but dealing with old evils. This story opens up with Chapter Fourteen, but it is a complete story arc in and of itself. Malika continues her search for the dragon stones, imbued with magical powers, in order to prevent them falling into the wrong hands. As one is located, Malika battles a Witch for the stone. The action scenes alone are worth the price of this graphic novel. They are drawn so vividly and with such detail and sound effects, you are pulled into the story and almost feel like you’re watching a movie as you move from panel to panel.


As the battle continues in an unexpected way, a London-based girl, Eliza Mantel, stumbles upon the action and the stone. The stones have a unique property in that they can chose which human to grant with the power of the stones. Let’s just say with one touch, Eliza’s world is opened up in a whole new way. With her dual powers of fire and frost, her best friend labels her with the superhero moniker of FireFrost. But those searching for the stones for evil, now seek Eliza. If she wants to live, she must learn to control her new powers. Malika is willing to teach Eliza, but is she willing to learn.


Oh, and there’s someone bent on dealing out ruthless and fatal revenge on Malika. Someone she doesn’t know, yet, but who knows her and her history well enough to want her dead.




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